Through the Looking Glass by Vik Reddy

With an almost reflexive narcissism, I am drawn to the physician in the essay.  I think of my own clinical practice when a patient whom I’ve taken care of shows up in an Emergency Room and I am not available—my guilt as a physician was compounded after reading of Ms. Rosenhaft’s sense of despair when she describes arriving at an institution taken care of by professionals who have no prior connection to her.
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The Unfinished Gaze of the Other by Roxana Delbene

In reading the articles of Ali Grzywna, Deborah L. Jones, and PratyushaYalamanchi, I found a similarity with my article written with Sayantani DasGupta, which appeared in the Spring 2016 Intima. Although these articles deal with apparently different topics (studying narratives of anorexia nervosa, interviewing a family member with cancer, dealing with communicative barriers in caring for a patient, and examining Frida Kahlo’s pictorial representation of her doctor), they all show a desire to get to know and better understand the predicament of the other.

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The Communities of Trauma by Wendy French

Therefore this article spoke to me as I’d written my poem based on Gurney’s words thinking about some of the people I’d worked with in the hospital; the dreadful hell that was going on inside each one as s/he reverted to an animal state before they could emerge to recognise themselves again. This can be replicated in warfare. It’s the closed community of war or hospitalization that can bring different states of being for each individual. So much so that they can barely recognise the person they once were.

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Hi-Tech/Lo-Tech by John Graham-Pole

Holly helps me befriend “high-tech,” perhaps for the first time—I can clearly picture those frozen embryonic cells as babes-to-be. And I’m transported back to hard-scrabble Glasgow, Scotland. To Annie, a fourteen-year-old lassie from the Gorbals, Glasgow’s biggest slum, who’d just given birth, on New Year’s Eve, 1973, to micro-preemie twins (father unknown). Far from being yearned for, these new arrivals were decidedly unwelcome—at least to their great-grandmother, already raising three other children, alongside Annie, in a single tenement room with a multi-family outdoor privy. 

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Writing as Self-Care for Nurses by Linda Kobert

Mayhew and McArthur focus mainly on the value to patients and families of having nurses “courageously” see their patients’ experiences and document those observations with compassion. In these narrative records, which clearly move beyond the confines of formal healthcare documentation, it seems important to also recognize that, in formulating this narrative for others, the nurse also benefits on a personal level. 

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Is There Anything Good About Parkinson's? Dr. Ronald Lands Talks About A Poem That Explores That Question

Adler’s poem illustrates with elegance what I experienced personally and what my wise patient tried to teach me. If there is anything good about Parkinson’s, pulmonary fibrosis or any other chronic, incurable disease, it is the time it gives to remember, to appreciate, to love in spite of a different theology or political leaning and time to prepare for the inevitable appointment that modern medicine might postpone, but never cancel.

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Narrative Secrets: Why Disclosure Day is the Hardest One for Clinicians by Maureen Hirthler

“Disclosure day in the clinic is the hardest,” says Kathryn Cantrell in her essay of the same name. As a child life specialist, her job is to encourage disclosure—the naming of illness and the sharing of that name with loved ones. Yet her own story is suppressed: “My advisor said I shouldn’t disclose—that a hospital won’t hire me if I tell them I had cancer, that I understand the process.” 

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