Boundlessness by Talia Malekan. Intima, Fall 2014.

Boundlessness by Talia Malekan. Intima, Fall 2014.

Submissions have closed for the Fall 2015 Intima journal. Please join our mailing list or check back in January 2016 for submission deadlines for our Spring 2016 issue

 


MEANWHILE.....Discover the work in the current issue. Here's a sampling of non-fiction pieces to explore:


 

Editors' Letter: A word or two about our current issue

The word "intima" has an anatomical reality, being a layer in an artery, which speeds blood to the heart and the brain. Our new logo reflects the dual nature of our mission, appealing to the intellect and the emotions.

The word "intima" has an anatomical reality, being a layer in an artery, which speeds blood to the heart and the brain. Our new logo reflects the dual nature of our mission, appealing to the intellect and the emotions.

Working on the current issue of Intima was intellectually stimulating, physically comforting, and thoroughly inspirational for us as editors during one of the harshest winters on record. While we are a far-flung group—living all over the world and communicating via email, Google Hangouts, and GroupMe—the nine of us operate under a basic tenet: The divides of healthcare need to be bridged in order for effective treatment to proceed. That sentence is a direct quote from Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness, a seminal text by Rita Charon, M.D., who along with her colleagues at the Columbia University Narrative Medicine department have supported our journal in infinite ways. We see our work at Intima as a way to engage in bridging that divide, as we publish poems, field notes, academic papers and prose that convey the close attention to individual stories necessary for effective healthcare. We witness doctors reflecting on the practice of medicine, like Hugh Silk does in “The Power of a Handshake” and Stephanie Reiff does in “Emergency Department.” We see their fears (“Stuck” by Vik Reddy); their navigation of different points of view (“The Tale of Three Breasts,” by Carol Scott-Connor); their grappling with end-of-life care (“Dying Well: Choose Your Beverage” by Yale medical students Esther Park and Gladys Rodriguez). We see patients and caregivers coming to grips with their own dance of illness (“Flying Into Jerusalem” by Katherine Macfarlane) or being at the bedside of a loved one during a terrible tragedy, as Andrea Hansell describes in her moving piece, “The Dragonslayer,” set at the time of the Boston Marathon bombings. These works cited are just a few of the remarkable narratives in our Spring 2015 issue. We hope our new, improved site makes it easier to find the riches within and our Crossroads blogs will renew you week after week. Walk across the bridge we’ve created and join us on the other side.


 

Draw on Narrative Medicine as a Resource

The Art of Anatomy | Khalil Harbie, Intima Fall 2013

The Art of Anatomy | Khalil Harbie, Intima Fall 2013

VISIT OUR STUDIO ART GALLERY

Along with the artwork we feature in our current issue, we invite you to make a gallery visit to look at the remarkable drawings, paintings, and imagery from our last seven journals. Hover over the image for the title, artist's name and issue.

Explore Intima with Our Writers, Past & Present

Read "Flying Into Jerusalem," lawyer Katherine Macfarlane's essay on infertility. 

Read "Flying Into Jerusalem," lawyer Katherine Macfarlane's essay on infertility. 

READ OUR CROSSROADS BLOG

Each week we post a new piece of writing on Crossroads. We ask our current contributors to reflect on work previously published in our journal.  Join our Facebook page or follow us on Twitter for updates about these postings. Would you like to be added to our email list? Click above and  join us.



MEET THE EDITORS

What do you need to know about us? Here are a few quick notes—we'd rather have you read one of the poems, field notes, stories or papers on our site than dwell on us.

  • We are a diverse group: doctors, journalists, writers, researchers, teachers, television and digital content producers, poets.
  • We live all over the world: London, Palo Alto, Jerusalem, Nashville, Pittsburgh, New York City.
  • We also reside in the world of health humanities and narrative medicine, each of us committed to a new model of healthcare and reflection.
  • We are an editorial board of nine; two of us are from the original group of founding editors; six of us have degrees in Narrative Medicine from Columbia University; one is a full-fledged doctor; four others are on their way to becoming one.
  • For more, click the button below.


"In Quotes"

Narrative Medicine is an emerging discipline in healthcare, and we at the Intima will be a source for new books, lectures, workshops and podcasts in the field starting in Summer 2015. Check back or sign up for our email list for more information. In the meantime, enjoy our weekly Crossroads blog and updated "In Quotes" excerpts from notable professionals in the field.

I Will Wear My Heart Upon My Sleeve by Trisha Paul. Spring 2013 Intima

I Will Wear My Heart Upon My Sleeve by Trisha Paul. Spring 2013 Intima

What makes an illness story good is the act of witness that says, implicitly or explicitly, “I will tell you not what you want to hear but what I know to be true because I have lived it.
— Arthur Frank, The Wounded Storyteller